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English definition of “customer”

customer

noun [C]
 
 
/ˈkʌstəmər/ COMMERCE
a person or an organization that buys a product or service: Our new ordering system means we can serve customers more efficiently. The company's simple strategy is to focus on the customer. We need to convert more website visitors to paying customers. We aim to respond to all customer complaints within 24 hours. appeal to/attract/bring in customers techniques to attract new customersa big/good/major customer The farm's biggest customer is a restaurant chain.a loyal/regular customer We like to reward loyal customers with special offers.future/potential/prospective customers a cost-effective way to reach prospective customersa satisfied/happy customer Studies show that each satisfied customer will tell one other person about your company.a dissatisfied/unhappy customer The store has changed its image in an effort to win back unhappy customers.customer expectations/needs/preferences They adapt their services to meet customer needs in different countries.customer evaluation/feedback/testing We now need to trial these products and get customer feedback before developing them further. → See also external customer, internal customer, preferred customer, repeat customer, target customer, ultimate consumer → Compare consumer
the customer is always right used to emphasize that, in business, it is very important not to disagree with a customer or make them angry: Our customer service representatives are trained to believe in the old saying that the customer is always right.
(Definition of customer from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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