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English definition of “exposure”

exposure

noun
 
 
/ɪkˈspəʊʒər/
[C or U] FINANCE the risk of losing money, for example through a loan or investment, or the amount of money that might be lost: exposure to sth The bank had relatively little exposure to subprime mortgages, which are issued to people with weak credit histories. If they do walk away from the deal their total exposure is around £40 million. → See also currency exposure, credit exposure, debt exposure, exchange rate exposure
[U] the state of possibly being affected by something such as a substance or influence: exposure to sth The city's youths need more exposure to positive role models.
[U] MARKETING the amount of public attention that someone or something, especially an advertisement or product, receives: The overall winner is guaranteed lots of media exposure.get/gain exposure The product is being advertised to bloggers with the hope of getting more exposure.
[U] FINANCE the act of investing in something: exposure to sth Her clients wanted more exposure to the energy and real estate sectors.
(Definition of exposure from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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