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English definition of “finance”

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finance

noun
 
 
/ˈfaɪnæns/
[U] UK ( also financing) money borrowed from an investor, bank, organization, etc. in order to pay for something: raise/get/obtain finance Other ways of raising finance include equity release on a home and flexible mortgages.arrange/provide/offer finance for sth The state-owned bank provides finance for buying homes.require/need/seek finance All of these strategies required finance.
[U] the activity or business of managing money, especially for a company or government: finance industry/sector Employment is expected to grow in finance, insurance, real estate, trade and services industries.finance minister/director/committee The finance director reported a 3% rise in sales.
[U] ECONOMICS the study of the way money is used and managed in the economy: There, he studied corporate finance and learned how to read income statements and balance sheets.
finances [plural] money that is available for a person, company, government, etc. to use, and the way that it is used: manage/control/handle your finances Many customers use online banking services to manage their finances.personal/public/government finances Recession and ill-judged tax cuts have put extra strain on the public finances. →  Compare fund noun
→  See also business finance , consumer finance , corporate finance , debt finance , equity finance , high finance , mezzanine finance , mortgage finance , personal finance , project finance , public finance
(Definition of finance noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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