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English definition of “government”

government

noun
 
 
/ˈɡʌvənmənt/ (written abbreviation govt) GOVERNMENT
[C] an organization that officially manages and controls a country or region, creating laws, collecting taxes, providing public services, etc.: The two governments have signed an agreement. This fiscal year would mark the third government surplus in a row for the first time in over 50 years. a federal/central/local/governmentgovernment official/regulator/employee Global business leaders and government officials gathered in Spain Friday for a meeting aimed at breaking down remaining trade barriers.government agency/department Some government agencies have worked well together to combat terrorist financing. government policy/program/services the Chinese/Italian/British government The Chinese government has implemented economic reforms.
[U] the people, systems, etc. that manage or control a country or region: The goal is to identify opportunities to reduce the cost of government. a democratic form of government. The President spoke of restoring confidence in government.
form a government to bring political parties together to make a government when none of them has received a large enough number of votes in an election to control the government: The former prime minister was seeking support from smaller parties to help form a government.
the government [S] the government of a particular country, especially the country you are in or the one you have already referred to: The government is proposing changes to subsidies for renewable energy sources. The figures are based on the government's survey of the labor force.
(Definition of government from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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