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English definition of “loss”

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loss

noun
 
 
/lɒs/
[C or U] a situation in which you no longer have something or have less of something, or the process that causes this: The loss of jobs in the convenience food industry seems inevitable.loss of earnings/income/pay She received compensation for loss of earnings through the illness.a loss in sth The new road will cause losses in economic value to many local properties.
[C] FINANCE, COMMERCE a situation in which a business or an organization spends more money than it earns, or loses money in another way: announce/post/report a loss (of sth) The company announced a loss of €1.3m last year. a loss in revenue big/financial/heavy losses a net/operating loss a pre-tax/after-tax lossincur/make/realize a loss In a bid to attract customers, some insurers may even be making a loss on contracts marketed to certain key buyers. a loss on an investment/a sale
[C] STOCK MARKET a situation in which the value of shares goes down: a loss in sth Gains in oil and gas were partly offset by losses in consumer products and precious metals.
[U] INSURANCE a situation in which property is damaged, lost, or stolen, and an insurance company must pay to replace it: We will cover your house contents against accidental loss or damage during the removal.
[C] a disadvantage caused by someone leaving an organization: be a loss to sb/sth It would be a great loss to the department if you left.
loss of face a situation in which someone loses the respect of other people because of something they have done: His first deal with the company had turned into a very public loss of face. →  See also lose
(Definition of loss from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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