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English definition of “positive”

positive

adjective
 
 
/ˈpɒzətɪv/
good or useful: Net exports were making a strong positive contribution to western European economic growth.a positive development/move In general, this is a positive development for consumers because it increases convenience and choice.a positive aspect/effect/impact These measures should have positive effects on exports and employment.a positive outcome/result Such methods do achieve positive results when certain key conditions are in place. → Compare negative adjective
expressing agreement or support: positive feedback/a positive response The response to the marketing campaign has been extremely positive. → Compare negative adjective
relating to a number or an amount that is more than zero: a positive balance The current account has also posted positive balances and this trend will continue. → Compare negative adjective
hopeful and confident about a situation: a positive approach/assessment/attituderemain positive about/on sth The company remains positive on the outlook for high-yield bonds this year. On a more positive note, we're seeing signs that the housing market is picking up.positive news for/on sth positive news on trading/for sterling → Compare negative adjective
used to describe strong action that is taken to achieve something: Positive action has been taken to change the image of the company.a positive step toward sth/doing sth Some Wall Street analysts described the management shakeup as a positive step toward restoring the company's credibility.
positively adverb
(Definition of positive adjective from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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