Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “return”

See all translations

return

verb
 
 
/rɪˈtɜːn/
[T] ACCOUNTING, FINANCE if a business or an investment returns an amount of money, it produces a profit: Last year all 60 branches of the business returned a profit. The account is low-risk but returns just 0.5% interest.
[T] COMMERCE to take or send a product back to the company that sold it to you. You usually do this if you want them to replace the product or to give you back your money: Customers who return goods must present a receipt to get cash or credit.
[T] to give back money that will not be used or that should not have been paid: If the sale does not go through, the agent is obliged by law to return the deposit. The department will return any overpayment or set it against your next tax bill.
[T] to phone someone who has called you earlier: I left several messages on his answer-phone, but he never returned my call. He did not return the multiple messages left on his cell phone.
[I] to go back to an earlier situation or to start doing something again: return to sth The refinery may not return to full production until later in the summer. Most women return to work at the end of their maternity leave.return to growth/profit The business is expected to return to growth next year.
return a cheque BANKING to send a cheque back to the person who wrote it, usually because they do not have enough money in the bank to pay the whole amount: The bank returned our cheque for lack of funds.
return a verdict LAW to give an official opinion in a court of law about whether someone is guilty of a crime: The jury returned a verdict of 'not guilty.'
(Definition of return verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of return?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “return” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

christmassy

typical of Christmas, or happy because it is Christmas

Word of the Day

Cleavage proves divisive in Cambridge’s words of 2014

by Alastair Horne,
December 19, 2014
​​​​ Other dictionaries may choose faddish novelties as their words of the year, but here at Cambridge, we like to do something different. We look for the words that have seen sudden surges in searches over the course of the year – words that have been baffling users of English and driven them

Read More 

cinderella surgery noun

December 15, 2014
cosmetic surgery to the feet We have all heard of people having nose jobs, boob jobs and liposuction – but now a new trend growing in popularity in America: Cinderella surgery.

Read More