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English definition of “speculation”

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speculation

noun [C or U]
 
 
/ˌspekjəˈleɪʃən/
the act of guessing possible answers to a question without having enough information to be certain: Rumours that the CEO is retiring have been dismissed as pure speculation.speculation about sth The news led to speculation about possible further departures among the senior executive team.speculation (that) There is speculation that fourth quarter GDP growth could be revised downwards. The dollar rose amid speculation that central banks could buy the currency in collaboration.fuel/prompt speculation The chairman's speech fuelled speculation that a merger will happen later in the year.on speculation The stock shot up recently on speculation that a financing package was imminent.
FINANCE the act of buying something hoping that its value will increase and then selling at this higher price in order to make a profit: speculation on/in sth Evidence that the economy is accelerating could fuel further speculation in commodity markets. The share issue coincided with a huge rise in amateur stock market speculation.
Translations of “speculation”
in Korean 추측, 예상…
in Arabic تَخمين…
in Portuguese especulação…
in Catalan especulació…
in Japanese 推測, 憶測…
in Italian congettura…
in Chinese (Traditional) 猜測, 推測,推斷…
in Russian предположение, домысел…
in Turkish tahmin yürütme, spekülasyon, kurgu…
in Chinese (Simplified) 猜测, 推测,推断…
in Polish spekulacje, domysły…
(Definition of speculation from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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