traffic noun - definition in the Business English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online (US)

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English definition of “traffic”

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traffic

noun [U]
 
 
/ˈtræfɪk/
TRANSPORT all the vehicles that are on a road or all the aircraft, trains, or ships that are along a route or in an area at a particular time: air/rail/road traffic All commercial air traffic in the area has been cancelled. Rome has a video tracking system installed to help reduce traffic congestion. Banks study migration and traffic trends in deciding where to locate branches.
TRANSPORT, COMMERCE people or goods transported by road, air, train, or ship, as a business: The loss of passenger and freight traffic to ferries and low cost airlines have forced Eurotunnel to produce yet another recovery programme.
IT the amount of data moving between computers or systems at a particular time: We need a telecom infrastructure that can handle fast-growing internet traffic. They need to convert to broadband to cope with the growing volume of data and voice traffic.
MARKETING the number of people buying goods or using a service at a particular time: Many casino companies produced solid earnings from heavy traffic during the New Year's holiday. The sites that are attracting traffic are professional blogs.
the illegal trade of goods or people: the brutal trade in human traffictraffic in/of sth Most of the traffic of narcotics is not detected.
→  See also foot traffic , page traffic , store traffic
(Definition of traffic noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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