shear verb (CUT) translation to Mandarin Chinese
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Translation of "shear" - English-Mandarin Chinese dictionary

shear

verb (CUT)
剪切
 
 
/ʃɪər/ US  /ʃɪr/ (sheared, sheared or shorn)
[T] to cut the wool off a sheep
给(羊)剪(羊毛)
The farmer taught her how to shear sheep.
那个农夫教了她如何剪羊毛。
Cutting and stabbingAnimal farming - general words
[T] to cut the hair on a person's head close to the skin, especially without care
(尤指草率地)剃光(头发)
He recalled the humiliation of having his hair shorn and exchanging his clothes for the prison uniform.
他记起了曾被剃光头、被迫换上囚服的耻辱。
Cutting and stabbingCare for the hair
be shorn of sth to have something taken away from you
被剥夺,被夺去
The ex-President, although shorn of his official powers, still has influence.
前总统虽然被剥夺了权力,但是仍有影响力。
Taking things away from someone or somewhereRemoving and getting rid of things
shearing
 
 
/ˈʃɪə.rɪŋ/ US  /ˈʃɪr.ɪŋ/ noun [U]
sheep shearing
剪羊毛
Cutting and stabbingAnimal farming - general words
(Definition of shear verb (CUT) from the Cambridge English-Chinese (Simplified) Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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