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Chinese (Traditional) translation of “mind”

mind

noun [C]
 
 
/maɪnd/
the part of a person that makes it possible for a person to think, feel emotions and understand things
頭腦;大腦
Her mind was full of what had happened the night before, and she just wasn't concentrating.
她腦海裡滿是前一天晚上所發生的事情,根本無法集中精神。
Of course I'm telling the truth - you've got such a suspicious mind!
我當然是在說實話——你太疑神疑鬼了!
I just said the first thing that came into my mind.
我只是想到甚麼就說甚麼。
I'm not quite clear in my mind about what I'm doing.
我沒太意識到自己在做甚麼。
Mind and personalityScience of psychology and psychoanalysis
a very clever person
聰明人,有才智的人
She was one of the most brilliant minds of the last century.
她是上世紀才智最為出眾的人物之一。
Intelligent people
all in the/your mind describes a problem that does not exist and is only imagined
全是心理作用的;只是憑空想像的
His doctor tried to convince him that he wasn't really ill and that it was all in the mind.
醫生努力想讓他相信他其實沒有生病,只是心理作用罷了。
True, real, false, and unreal
bear/keep sth in mind to remember a piece of information when you are making a decision or thinking about a matter
記住
Bearing in mind how young she is, I thought she did really well.
別忘了她年紀是那麼小,我認為她做得很棒了。
Of course, repair work is expensive and you have to keep that in mind.
當然,維修費很昂貴,你必須記住這一點。
Remembering, reminding and reminders
go over sth in your mind (also turn sth over in your mind) to think repeatedly about an event that has happened
反覆思考
She would go over the accident again and again in her mind, wishing that she could somehow have prevented it.
她不斷地想起那次意外,希望當時要是能做點甚麼來避免就好了。
Remembering, reminding and remindersThinking and contemplating
(Definition of mind noun from the Cambridge English-Chinese (Traditional) Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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