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French translation of “grow”

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grow

verb /ɡrəu/ ( past tense grew /ɡruː/, past participle grown)
(of plants) to develop
pousser
Carrots grow well in this soil.
to become bigger, longer etc
grandir
My hair has grown too long Our friendship grew as time went on.
to cause or allow to grow
laisser pousser
He has grown a beard.
(with into) to change into, in becoming mature
devenir
Your daughter has grown into a beautiful woman.
to become
devenir
It’s growing dark.
grower noun a person who grows (plants etc)
producteur/-trice
a tomato grower.
grown adjective adult
adulte
a grown man These deer are fully grown.
growth // noun the act or process of growing, increasing, developing etc
croissance
the growth of trade unionism.
something that has grown
pousse
a week’s growth of beard.
the amount by which something grows
croissance
We measured the growth of the plant over a two-week period.
something unwanted which grows
excroissance
a cancerous growth.
grown-up noun an adult.
adulte
grown-up adjective mature; adult; fully grown
grand, adulte
Her children are grown up now a grown-up daughter.
grow on to gradually become liked
finir par plaire
I didn’t like the painting at first, but it has grown on me.
grow up to become an adult
devenir adulte
I’m going to be an train driver when I grow up.
(Definition of grow from the Password English-French Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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