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French translation of “sell”

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sell

verb /sel/ ( past tense, past participle sold /sould/)
to give something in exchange for money
vendre
He sold her a car I’ve got some books to sell.
to have for sale
vendre
The farmer sells milk and eggs.
to be sold
se vendre
His book sold well.
to cause to be sold
faire vendre
Packaging sells a product.
sell-out noun an event, especially a concert, for which all the tickets are sold
(concert, etc.) à guichets fermés
His concert was a sell-out.
a betrayal
trahison
The gang realized it was a sell-out and tried to escape.
be sold on to be enthusiastic about
être emballé (par)
I’m sold on the idea of a holiday in Canada.
be sold out to be no longer available
épuisé; à guichets fermés
The concert is sold out.
to have no more available to be bought
être en rupture de stock
We are sold out of children’s socks.
sell down the river to betray
trahir
The gang was sold down the river by one of its associates.
sell off to sell quickly and cheaply
liquider
They’re selling off their old stock.
sell out (sometimes with of) to sell all of something
liquider
We sold out our entire stock.
to be all sold
être épuisé
The laptops sold out within minutes of the sale starting.
sell up to sell a house, business etc
vendre
He has sold up his share of the business.
(Definition of sell from the Password English-French Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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