wing translation English to French: Cambridge Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Translation of "wing" - English-French dictionary

wing

noun /wiŋ/
one of the arm-like limbs of a bird or bat, which it usually uses in flying, or one of the similar limbs of an insect aile The eagle spread his wings and flew away The bird cannot fly as it has an injured wing These butterflies have red and brown wings. a similar structure jutting out from the side of an aeroplane aile the wings of a jet. a section built out to the side of a (usually large) house aile the west wing of the hospital. any of the corner sections of a motor vehicle aile The rear left wing of the car was damaged. a section of a political party or of politics in general aile the Left/Right wing. one side of a football etc field aile He made a great run down the left wing. in rugby and hockey, a player who plays mainly down one side of the field. ailier in the air force, a group of three squadrons of aircraft. escadre/brigade aérienne winged adjective having wings ailé a winged creature. -winged à (…) ailes a four-winged insect. winger noun in football etc, a player who plays mainly down one side of the field. ailier wingless adjective sans ailes wings noun plural the sides of a theatre stage coulisses She waited in the wings. wing commander in the air force, the rank above squadron leader. lieutenant-colonel wingspan noun the distance from the tip of one wing to the tip of the other when outstretched (of birds, aeroplanes etc). envergure on the wing flying, especially away en vol The wild geese are on the wing. take under one’s wing to take (someone) under one’s protection prendre sous son aile He took the young man under his wing and treated him like a son.
(Definition of wing from the Password English-French Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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