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German translation of “apply”

apply

verb /əˈplai/
(with to) to put (something) on or against something else
auftragen
She applied ointment to the cut.
(with to) to use (something) for some purpose
anwenden
He applied his wits to planning their escape.
(with for) to ask for (something) formally
sich bewerben (um)
You could apply (to the manager) for a job.
(with to) to concern
zutreffen
This rule applies to all students.
to be in force
gelten
The rule doesn’t apply at weekends.
appliance /əˈplai-/ noun an instrument or tool used for a particular job
die Anwendung
The company makes washing machines and other electrical appliances.
applicable /ˈӕpli-/ adjective
anwendbar
This rule is not applicable (to you) any longer.
applicability noun
die Anwendbarkeit
applicant /ˈӕpli-/ noun a person who applies (for a job etc)
der/die Bewerber(in)
There were two hundred applicants for the position.
application /ӕpli-/ noun a formal request; an act of applying
die Bewerbung
We have received several applications for the new job The syllabus can be obtained on application to the headmaster.
hard work
der Fleiß
He has got a good job through sheer application.
an ointment etc applied to a cut, wound etc.
das Auftragen
apply oneself/one’s mind (with to) to give one’s full attention or energy (to a task etc)
sich bemühen
If he applied himself, he could pass his exams.
(Definition of apply from the Password English-German Dictionary © 2014 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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