side translation English to Italian: Cambridge Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Translation of "side" - English-Italian dictionary

side

noun   /saɪd/
A2 one of the two parts that something would divide into if you drew a line down the middle parte I sleep on the left side of the bed.
A2 a flat, outer surface of an object, especially one that is not its top, bottom, front, or back lato, fianco, fiancata The side of the car was badly scratched.
A2 one edge of something lato A square has four sides.
B1 the area next to something lato He stood by the side of the road, waiting for the bus.
one of the people or groups who are arguing, fighting, or competing parte Whose side is he on?
[no plural] part of a situation that can be considered or dealt with separately aspetto, lato She looks after the financial side of things.
either of the two surfaces of a thin, flat object such as a piece of paper or a coin lato Write on both sides of the paper.
UK the players in a sports team squadra He was been selected for the national side.
one of the two areas of your body from under your arms to the tops of your legs fianco She lay on her side.
[no plural] a part of someone’s character aspetto (di carattere) She has a very practical side.
from side to side If something moves from side to side, it moves from left to right and back again repeatedly. da una parte all’altra He shook his head from side to side.
side by side If two things or people are side by side, they are next to each other. accanto We sat side by side on the sofa.
(Definition of side from the Cambridge English-Italian Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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