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Japanese translation of side

side

noun
 
/saɪd/
A2 one of the two parts that something would divide into if you drew a line down the middle
(2つに分けた部分の)片側
I sleep on the left side of the bed.
A2 a flat, outer surface of an object, especially one that is not its top, bottom, front, or back
(物体の)側面, 面
The side of the car was badly scratched.
A2 one edge of something
A square has four sides.
B1 the area next to something
~の横, 隣
He stood by the side of the road, waiting for the bus.
one of the people or groups who are arguing, fighting, or competing
(敵・味方の)側, ~派
Whose side is he on?
[no plural] part of a situation that can be considered or dealt with separately
(問題などの)一面, 側面
She looks after the financial side of things.
either of the two surfaces of a thin, flat object such as a piece of paper or a coin
(紙などの)片面
Write on both sides of the paper.
UK the players in a sports team
(スポーツの)組, チーム
He was been selected for the national side.
one of the two areas of your body from under your arms to the tops of your legs
横腹
She lay on her side.
[no plural] a part of someone’s character
(性格の)一面
She has a very practical side.
from side to side If something moves from side to side, it moves from left to right and back again repeatedly.
左右に
He shook his head from side to side.
side by side If two things or people are side by side, they are next to each other.
横に並んで
We sat side by side on the sofa.
(Definition of side from the Cambridge English-Japanese Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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