stand verb translation English to Korean: Cambridge Dictionary

Translation of "stand" - English-Korean dictionary


/stænd/ ( present participle standing, past tense and past participle stood)
A2 to be in a vertical position on your feet
서 있다
We stood there for an hour. He’s standing over there, next to Karen.
A2 ( also stand up) to rise to a vertical position on your feet from sitting or lying down
일어 서다
I get dizzy if I stand up too quickly. Please stand when the bride arrives.
to be in a particular place or position
(특정 위치에) 서 있다
The tower stands in the middle of a field.
to put something in a particular place or position
(특정 위치에) 세우다
She stood the umbrella by the door.
can’t stand someone/something informal B1 to hate someone or something
-가 질색이다
I can’t stand him – he’s so rude! She can’t stand doing housework.
stand in someone’s way to try to stop or prevent
-를 방해하다
You know I won’t stand in your way if you want to apply for a job abroad.
standing on your head If you can do something standing on your head, you can do it very easily.
-하기는 식은죽 먹기다
It’s the sort of program Andrew could write standing on his head.
(Definition of stand verb from the Cambridge English-Korean Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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