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Translation of "part" - English-Polish dictionary

part

noun     /pɑːt/
NOT ALL [C, U]
A1 one of the things that, with other things, makes the whole of something część Part of this form seems to be missing. I did French as part of my degree course. It's all part of growing up. You're part of the family.Words meaning parts of things
take part (in sth)
B1 to be involved in an activity with other people brać udział (w czymś ), uczestniczyć (w czymś ) She doesn't usually take part in any of the class activities.Taking part and getting involvedGetting involved for one's own benefit or against others' will
FILM/PLAY [C]
B1 a person in a film or play rola He plays the part of the father.Casting, roles and scripts
have/play a part in sth
B2 to be one of the people or things that are involved in an event or situation odgrywać rolę w czymś Alcohol plays a part in 60 percent of violent crime.Taking part and getting involvedGetting involved for one's own benefit or against others' will
MACHINE [C]
B2 a piece of a machine or vehicle część aircraft parts spare parts Words meaning parts of things
HAIR [C] US ( UK parting)
the line on your head made by brushing your hair in two different directions przedziałek Hairstyles
the best/better part of sth
most of a period of time większość czegoś It took the better part of the afternoon to put those shelves up.Large in number or quantity
in part formal
partly częściowo He is in part to blame for the accident.Incomplete
for the most part
mostly or usually zasadniczo, przeważnie I enjoyed it for the most part.General
(Definition of part noun from the Cambridge English-Polish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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