Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Russian translation of “sense”

See all translations

sense

noun
 
 
/sens/
GOOD JUDGMENT [U] B1 good judgment, especially about practical things
здравый смысл, благоразумие
He had the good sense to book a seat in advance.Wise and sensible
ABILITY [no plural] B2 the ability to do something
чувство, чутье
a sense of direction good business sense Skill, talent and ability
NATURAL ABILITY [C] B2 one of the five natural abilities of sight, hearing, touch, smell, and taste
чувство
I have a very poor sense of smell.The senses in general
a sense of humour UK ( US sense of humor) B1 the ability to understand funny things and to be funny yourself
чувство юмора
Humour and humorous
a sense of loyalty/responsibility/security, etc the quality or feeling of being loyal, responsible, safe, etc
чувство верности/ответственности/безопасности и т. д.
He has absolutely no sense of loyalty.Feelings - general words
MEANING [C] B2 the meaning of a word, phrase, or sentence
смысл, значение
Linguistic terms and linguistic styleMeaning and significanceTypifying, illustrating and exemplifying
in a sense/in some senses thinking about something in a particular way
в некотором смысле, до некоторой степени
In a sense, he's right.Ways of achieving things
make sense B2 to have a meaning or reason that you can understand
иметь смысл, быть понятным
He's written me this note but it doesn't make any sense.Meaning and significanceTypifying, illustrating and exemplifying
B2 to be a good thing to do
иметь смысл, быть разумным
[+ to do sth] It makes sense to buy now while prices are low.Wise and sensible
make sense of sth to understand something that is difficult to understand
понять смысл, разобраться
I'm trying to make sense of this document.Understanding and comprehending
→  See also common sense , come to your senses
(Definition of sense noun from the Cambridge English-Russian Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “sense” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

limber up

to do gentle exercises to stretch the muscles in order to prepare the body for more active physical exercise

Word of the Day

Byronic, Orwellian and Darwinian: adjectives from names.

by Liz Walter,
April 15, 2015
Becoming an adjective is a strange kind of memorial, but it is often a sign of a person having had real influence on the world. Science is full of examples, from Hippocrates, the Greek medic born around 460 BC, who gave his name to the Hippocratic Oath still used by doctors today,

Read More 

bio-inspiration noun

April 13, 2015
the adoption of patterns and structures found in nature for the purposes of engineering, manufacturing, science, etc. The MIT researchers actually aren’t the only robotics team to turn to cheetahs for bio-inspiration.

Read More