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Spanish translation of “best”

best

adjective, pronoun /best/
(something which is) good to the greatest extent
mejor
She wrote the best book on the subject This is the best (that) I can do She is my best friend Which method is (the) best? The flowers are at their best just now.
best man noun a man who helps the bridegroom at a wedding
padrino de boda
The best man was looking after the ring.
bestseller noun something (usually a book) which sells very many copies
best seller, éxito de ventas
Ernest Hemingway wrote several bestsellers.
the best part of most of; nearly (all of)
la mayoría (de)
I’ve read the best part of two hundred books on the subject.
do one’s best to try as hard as possible
hacer lo posible
He did his best to be there on time.
for the best intended to have the best results possible
con la mejor intención, para el bien de alguien
We don’t want to send our son away to boarding school, but we’re doing it for the best.
get the best of to win, or get some advantage from, (a fight, argument etc)
salir ganando
He was shouting a lot, but I think I got the best of the argument.
make the best of it to do all one can to turn a failure etc into something successful
tomarse algo lo mejor posible, ver el lado bueno de algo
She is disappointed at not getting into university, but she’ll just have to make the best of it and find a job.
(Definition of best from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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