breath translation English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary

Translation of "breath" - English-Spanish dictionary


noun /breθ/
the air drawn into, and then sent out from, the lungs
aliento, respiración
My dog’s breath smells terrible.
an act of breathing
Take a deep breath.
breathless adjective having difficulty in breathing normally
sin aliento, sofocado
His asthma makes him breathless He was breathless after climbing the hill.
breathlessly adverb
jadeante, sin aliento
She struggled breathlessly up the stairs.
breathlessness noun
sofoco, falta de aliento, dificultad respiratoria
Breathlessness may be a sign of heart failure.
hold one’s breath to stop breathing (often because of anxiety or to avoid being heard)
contener la respiración
He held his breath as he watched the daring acrobat.
out of breath adjective breathless (through running etc)
sofocado, sin aliento
I’m out of breath after climbing all these stairs.
under one’s breath in a whisper
a media voz, en voz baja, en un susurro
He swore under his breath.
breath is a noun: He held his breath. breathe is a verb: He found it difficult to breathe.
(Definition of breath from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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