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Spanish translation of “Christmas”

Christmas

noun /ˈkrisməs/
an annual festival in memory of the birth of Christ, held on December 25, Christmas Day
Navidad
Where are you spending Christmas this year?
Christmas carol noun a Christian religious song which people sing at Christmas
Villancico
The children were singing Christmas carols.
Christmas cracker noun a tube of coloured/colored paper tube which makes an explosive noise when two people pull it apart. Christmas crackers typically contain a small present, a paper hat, and a joke printed on a small piece of paper
Petardo de Navidad
Wouuld you like to pull a Christmas cracker with me?
Christmas Day noun December 25, the day when Christians celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ
Dia de Navidad
We’re spending Christmas Day at my parents’ house.
Christmas Eve noun December 24
Nochebuena
Children traditionally hang up stockings on Christmas Eve for Santa Clause to fill with presents.
Christmas pudding noun a rich steamed pudding containing dried fruit, spices, and brandy which is eaten at Christmas
Postre Navideño
The Christmas pudding was decorated with a pair of holly leaves.
Christmas stocking noun a long sock which children hang up in their houses on Christmas Eve for Santa Claus to fill with small presents while they are asleep
Calcetín de Navidad
The children hung their Christmas stockings up outside their bedroom doors.
Christmas tree noun a (usually fir) tree on which decorations and Christmas gifts are hung
árbol de Navidad
Terry halped me to decorate the Christmas tree.
(Definition of Christmas from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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