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Translation of "death" - English-Spanish dictionary

death

noun   /deθ/
B1 the end of life muerte After the death of her husband she lost interest in life. We need to reduce the number of deaths from heart attacks.
bored, frightened, etc. to death
extremely bored, frightened, etc. muy aburrido, asustado, etc. She’s scared to death of dogs.
put someone to death
to kill someone as a punishment matar a alguien She was put to death for her beliefs.
(Definition of death from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

death

noun /deθ/
the act of dying muerte There have been several deaths in the town recently Most people fear death.
something which causes one to die muerte Smoking too much will be the death of him.
the state of being dead muerte Her eyes were closed in death.
deathly adjective, adverb
as if caused by death mortal a deathly silence It was deathly quiet.
death bed noun
the bed in which a person dies lecho de muerte He had converted to Catholicism while on his death bed.
death certificate noun
an official piece of paper signed by a doctor stating the cause of someone’s death. partida de defunción
death penalty noun ( plural death penalties)
the legal punishment of being killed for a very serious crime Pena de Muerte He faces the death penalty for committing murder.
at death’s door
on the point of dying en las puertas de la muerte When they found him, he was practically at death’s door.
catch one’s death (of cold)
to get a very bad cold pillar una galipandria If you go out in that rain without a coat, you’ll catch your death (of cold).
put to death
to cause to be killed ejecutar In the old days, criminals were put to death by hanging.
to death
very much a muerte I’m sick to death of you.
(Definition of death from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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