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Spanish translation of “divide”

divide

verb /diˈvaid/
to separate into parts or groups
dividir
The wall divided the garden in two The group divided into three when we got off the bus We are divided (= We do not agree) as to where to spend our holidays.
(with betweenor among) to share
repartir
We divided the sweets between us.
to find out how many times one number contains another
dividir
6 divided by 2 equals 3.
dividers noun plural a measuring instrument used in geometry
compás
a pair of dividers.
divisible /diˈvizəbl/ adjective able to be divided
divisible
100 is divisible by 4.
division /diˈviʒən/ noun (an) act of dividing
división
the division of the cake into slices
something that separates; a dividing line
separación
A ditch marks the division between their two fields.
a part or section (of an army etc)
división
He belongs to B division of the local police force.
(a) separation of thought; disagreement
desacuerdo, diferencia
a division among party members.
the process finding out how many times one number is contained in another
división
The children are learning how to do long division.
divisional /diˈviʒənl/ adjective of a division
de división, divisional
The soldier contacted divisional headquarters.
divisive /diˈvaisiv/ adjective causing a lot of arguments between people
Divisivo
a divisive issue/policy..
(Definition of divide from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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