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Spanish translation of “join”

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join

verb /dʒoin/
(often with up, onetc) to put together or connect
juntar, unir
The electrician joined the wires (up) wrongly You must join this piece (on) to that piece He joined the two stories together to make a play The island is joined to the mainland by a sandbank at low tide.
to connect (two points) eg by a line, as in geometry
unir
Join point A to point B.
to become a member of (a group)
hacerser socio de, afiliarse
She was thinking of joining the tennis club.
(sometimes with up) to meet and come together (with)
juntarse, confluir
This lane joins the main road Do you know where the two rivers join? They joined up with us for the remainder of the holiday.
to come into the company of
reunirse con, unirse a
I’ll join you later in the restaurant.
join forces to come together for united work or action
aunar esfuerzos
We would do better if we joined forces (with each other).
join hands to clasp one another’s hands (eg for dancing)
cogerse de las manos
Join hands with your partner They joined hands in a ring.
join in phrasal verb to take part (in)
participar, intervenir en
We’re playing a game – do join in! He would not join in the dancee.
join up phrasal verb to become a member of an armed force
alistarse
He joined up in 1940.
(Definition of join from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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