level translation English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "level" - English-Spanish dictionary

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level

noun /ˈlevl/
height, position, strength, rank etc
nivel
The level of the river rose Dolphins possess a high level of intelligence.
a horizontal division or floor
nivel
We’re parked on the third level of the multi-storey car park.
a kind of instrument for showing whether a surface is level
nivel
a spirit level.
a flat, smooth surface or piece of land
llano, llanura
It was difficult running uphill, but he could run fast on the level.
levelness noun
nivelación; calidad uniforme
level crossing noun (British ) a place where a road crosses a railway/railroad without a bridge; railroad crossing(American)
paso a nivel
level-headed adjective calm and sensible
sensato, equilibrado
a level-headed young man who is unlikely to do anything stupid.
do one’s level best to do one’s very best.
hacer todo lo posible
She did her level best to beat her opponent.
level off phrasal verb to make or become flat, even, steady etc
enderezarse, estabilizarse
After rising for so long, prices have now levelled off.
level out phrasal verb to make or become level
nivelarse
The road levels out as it comes down to the plain.
on a level with level with
al mismo nivel que
His eyes were on a level with the shop counter.
on the level (informal) fair or honest
de fiar, honrado
He’s always been on the level whenever I’ve done bsuiness with him.
(Definition of level from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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