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Spanish translation of “meet”

meet

verb /miːt/ (past tense, past participle met /met/)
to come face to face with (eg a person whom one knows), by chance
encontrar, encontrarse con
She met a man on the train.
(sometimes, especially American, with with) to come together with (a person etc), by arrangement
encontrar, reunirse con, citarse, quedar
The committee meets every Monday.
to be introduced to (someone) for the first time
conocer
Come and meet my wife.
to join
unirse
Where do the two roads meet?
to be equal to or satisfy (eg a person’s needs, requirements etc)
satisfacer
Will there be sufficient stocks to meet the public demand?
to come into the view, experience or presence of
encontrar
A terrible sight met him / his eyes when he opened the door.
to come to or be faced with
encontrar
He met his death in a car accident.
(with with) to experience or suffer; to receive a particular response
sufrir; recibir
She met with an accident The scheme met with their approval.
to answer or oppose
responder (a)
We will meet force with greater force.
meeting noun an act of meeting
encuentro
The meeting between my mother and my husband was not friendly.
a gathering of people for discussion or another purpose
reunión
I have to attend a committee meeting.
meet (someone) halfway to respond to (someone) by making an equal effort or a compromise
llegar a un acuerdo
I’ll invest $5,000 in this venture if you meet me halfway and do the same.
(Definition of meet from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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