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Translation of "principle" - English-Spanish dictionary

principle

noun   /ˈprɪn·sɪ·pl/
a belief about how you should behave principio He must be punished – it’s a matter of principle.
on principle
If you refuse to do something on principle, you refuse to do it because you think it is wrong. por principios She doesn’t wear fur on principle.
(Definition of principle from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

principle

noun /ˈprinsəpəl/
a general truth, rule or law principio the principle of gravity.
the theory by which a machine etc works principio the principle of the jet engine.
principles noun plural
one’s own personal rules or standards of behaviour/behavior principios It is against my principles to borrow money.
in principle
in general, as opposed to in detail en principio In principle, we shoudl be able to complete the work by the beginning of July.
on principle
because of one’s principles por principio I never borrow money, on principle.
high moral principles (not principals).
(Definition of principle from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
Translations of “principle”
in Korean 원칙…
in Arabic مَبْدَأ…
in Malaysian prinsip…
in French principe…
in Russian принцип, правило…
in Chinese (Traditional) 基本思想, 原理, 原則…
in Italian principio…
in Turkish ilke, prensip, genel kural ve uygulamalar…
in Polish zasada, zasady…
in Vietnamese nguyên lý, nguyên tắc cấu tạo…
in Portuguese princípio…
in Thai กฎ, ทฤษฎี…
in German das Gesetz, die Grundregel…
in Catalan principi…
in Japanese 道義, 主義, 信条…
in Chinese (Simplified) 基本思想, 原理, 原则…
in Indonesian prinsip…
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