small translation English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Translation of "small" - English-Spanish dictionary

small

adjective /smoːl/
little in size, degree, importance etc; not large or great pequeño She was accompanied by a small boy of about six There’s only a small amount of sugar left She cut the meat up small for the baby. not doing something on a large scale pequeño He’s a small businessman. little; not much poco You have small reason to be satisfied with yourself. (of the letters of the alphabet) not capital minúsculo The teacher showed the children how to write a capital G and a small g. small ads noun plural advertisements in the personal columns of a newspaper pequeños anuncios, anuncios por palabras You could look in the small ads to see if anyone has a room to rent. small arms noun plural weapons small and light enough to be carried by a man armas portátiles They found a hoard of rifles and other small arms belonging to the rebels. small change noun coins of small value cambio, monedas sueltas a pocketful of small change. small hours noun plural the hours immediately after midnight altas horas, madrugada He woke up in the small hours. smallpox noun (medical ) a type of serious infectious disease in which there is a severe rash of large, pus-filled spots that usually leave scars viruela an epidemic of smallpox. small screen noun television, not the cinema pequeña pantalla This play is intended for the small screen. small-time adjective (of a thief etc) not working on a large scale de poca monta a small-time crook/thief. feel/look small to feel or look foolish or insignificant sentirse insignificante/pequeño He criticized her in front of her colleagues and made her feel very small.
(Definition of small from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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