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Translation of "stiff" - English-Spanish dictionary

stiff

adjective   /stɪf/
hard and difficult to bend or move rígido, duro, tieso stiff paper The windows were stiff.
If a part of your body is stiff, it hurts and does not move as easily as it should. agarrotado stiff muscles
stiffly adverb /ˈstɪf·li/
rígidamente
stiffness noun [no plural] /ˈstɪf·nəs/
rigidez, dureza
(Definition of stiff from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

stiff

adjective /stif/
rigid or firm, and not easily bent, folded etc rígido, tieso He has walked with a stiff leg since he injured his knee stiff cardboard.
moving, or moved, with difficulty, pain etc duro I can’t turn the key – the lock is stiff I woke up with a stiff neck I felt stiff the day after the climb.
(of a cooking mixture etc) thick, and not flowing espeso a stiff dough.
difficult to do difícil a stiff examination.
strong fuerte a stiff breeze.
(of a person or his manner etc) formal and unfriendly frío, formal, estirado I received a stiff note from the bank manager.
stiffly adverb
rígidamente
stiffness noun
rigidez She could feel some stiffness in her legs after the long walk.
stiffen verb
to make or become stiff(er) fortalecer, endurecer, poner rígido You can stiffen cotton with starch He stiffened when he heard the unexpected sound.
stiffening noun
material used to stiffen something refuerzo The collar has some stiffening in it.
bore/scare stiff
to bore or frighten very much aburrirse como una ostra; estar muerto de miedo They were bored stiff by hearing the same old stories again and again..
(Definition of stiff from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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