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Translation of "subject" - English-Spanish dictionary

subject

adjective /ˈsabdʒikt/
(of countries etc) not independent, but dominated by another power dominado, subyugado subject nations.
subjection /səbˈdʒekʃən/ noun
sujección, sometimiento
subjective /səbˈdʒektiv/ adjective
(of a person’s attitude etc) arising from, or influenced by, his own thoughts and feelings only; not objective or impartial subjetivo You must try not to be too subjective if you are on a jury in a court of law.
subjectively adverb
subjetivamente
subject matter noun
the subject discussed in an essay, book etc asunto The subject matter of his latest article is multicultural Britain.
change the subject
to start talking about something different cambiar de tema/asunto I mentioned the money to her, but she changed the subject.
subject to
liable or likely to suffer from or be affected by (ser) propenso a; (estar) sujeto a He is subject to colds The programme is subject to alteration.
depending on dependiendo de These plans will be put into practice next week, subject to your approval.
Translations of “subject”
in Vietnamese lệ thuộc, dưới quyền…
in Thai ซึ่งขึ้นอยู่กับ…
in Malaysian dijajah…
in French assujetti…
in German abhängig…
in Chinese (Traditional) 擁有…
in Indonesian terjajah…
in Chinese (Simplified) 拥有…
(Definition of subject from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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