Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Spanish translation of “swear”

swear

verb /sweə/ (past tense swore /swoː/, past participle sworn /swoːn/)
to state, declare, or promise solemnly with an oath, or very definitely and positively
jurar
The witness must swear to tell the truth He swore an oath of loyalty Swear never to reveal the secret I could have sworn (= I’m sure) she was here a minute ago.
to use the name of God and other sacred words, or obscene words, for emphasis or abuse; to curse
blasfemar
Don’t swear in front of the children!
sworn /swoːn/ adjective (of friends, enemies etc) (determined, as if) having taken an oath always to remain so
declarado; (traductor u otro cargo tomado bajo juramento) jurado
They are sworn enemies.
(of evidence, statements etc) given by a person who has sworn to tell the truth
bajo juramento
The prisoner made a sworn statement.
swear word noun a word used in cursing
palabrota, taco, grosería
’Damn’ is a mild swear word.
swear by phrasal verb to appeal to (eg God) as a witness of one’s words
jurar por
I swear by Heaven that I’m innocent.
to put complete trust in (a remedy etc)
tener una fe absoluta (en), creer ciegamente (en)
She swears by aspirin for all the children’s illnesses.
swear in phrasal verb to introduce (a person) into a post or office formally, by making him swear an oath
tomar juramento a
The new Governor is being sworn in next week.
swear to phrasal verb to make a solemn statement, with an oath, in support of
jurar; poner la mano en el fuego
I’ll swear to the truth of what he said I think he was here this morning, but I wouldn’t like to swear to it.
(Definition of swear from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “swear” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

see the light of day

When something sees the light of day, it appears for the first time.

Word of the Day

Highly delighted, bitterly disappointed, ridiculously cheap: adverbs for emphasis.

by Liz Walter,
October 22, 2014
We often make adjectives stronger by putting an adverb in front of them. The most common ones are very and, for a stronger meaning, extremely: He was very pleased. The ship is extremely large. However, we don’t use very or extremely for adjectives that already have a strong meaning, for example fantastic,

Read More 

life tracking noun

October 20, 2014
the use of one or more devices or apps to monitor health, exercise, how time is spent, etc.

Read More