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Spanish translation of “wall”

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wall

noun /woːl/
something built of stone, brick, plaster, wood etc and used to separate off or enclose something
muro, tapia, muralla; pared
There’s a wall at the bottom of the garden The Great Wall of China a garden wall.
any of the sides of a building or room
pared
One wall of the room is yellow – the rest are white.
walled adjective
amurallado, fortificado; tapiado
a walled city.
-walled suffix having (a certain type or number of) wall(s)
de paredes/muros…
a high-walled garden.
wallpaper noun paper used to decorate interior walls of houses etc
papel pintado
patterned wallpaper My wife wants to put wallpaper on the walls, but I would rather paint them.
wall-to-wall adjective (of a carpet etc ) covering the entire floor of a room etc
de pared a pared; (alfombra) moqueta
wall-to-wall carpeting.
have one’s back to the wall to be in a desperate situation
estar/encontrarse entre la espada y la pared
The army in the south have their backs to the wall, and are fighting a losing battle.
up the wall crazy
loco
This business is sending/driving me up the wall!
Translations of “wall”
in Korean 벽, 담…
in Arabic حائط, سور…
in French mur(aille), mur…
in Italian muro, parete…
in Chinese (Traditional) 牆,牆壁,圍牆, (身體中中空結構的)壁, 人牆…
in Russian стена, ограда…
in Turkish duvar…
in Polish ściana, mur…
in Portuguese muro, parede…
in German die Mauer, die Wand…
in Catalan paret, mur…
in Japanese 壁, 塀…
in Chinese (Simplified) 墙,墙壁,围墙, (身体中中空结构的)壁, 人墙…
(Definition of wall from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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