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Translation of "your" - English-Spanish dictionary

your

determiner   strong /jɔːr/ weak /r/
A1 belonging or relating to the person or people you are talking to tu, su, vuestro Can I borrow your pen? It’s not your fault.
B1 belonging or relating to people in general de uno You never stop loving your children.
(Definition of your from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

your

adjective /joː, (American) juər/
belonging to you tu, tus; vuestro, vuestra, vuestros, vuestras; su, sus your house/car.
yours /joːz, (American) juərz/ pronoun
something belonging to you (el) tuyo, (la) tuya, (los) tuyos, (las) tuyas; (el) suyo, (la) suya, (los) suyos, (las) suyas (formal); (el) vuestro, (la) vuestra, (los) vuestros, (las) vuestras This book is yours Yours is on that shelf.
yourself /-ˈselvz/ pronoun ( plural yourselves)
used as the object of a verb or preposition when the person(s) spoken or written to is/are the object(s) of an action he/they perform(s) te, se Why are you looking at yourselves in the mirror? You can dry yourself with this towel.
used to emphasize you tú mismo, usted mismo; tú misma, usted misma You yourself can’t do it, but you could ask someone else to do it.
without help etc tú mismo; tú misma You can jolly well do it yourself!
yours (faithfully/sincerely/truly)
expressions written before one’s signature at the end of a letter. le saluda…
(Definition of your from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
Translations of “your”
in Vietnamese của bạn, mày, anh…
in Malaysian kamu…
in Thai ของคุณ…
in French votre/vos, ton/ta/tes…
in German dein/e, euer, euere…
in Indonesian milikmu…
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