age Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “age” - English Dictionary

Definition of "age" - American English Dictionary

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agenoun

 us   /eɪdʒ/

age noun (TIME SPENT ALIVE)

the ​length of ​time someone has been ​alive or something has ​existed: [C] At age 24 he ​won a starring ​role in his first ​movie. [U] She was 74 ​years of age when she ​wrote her first ​novel. The ​program is ​aimed at ​viewers in the 18-to-30 age ​group.

age noun (PERIOD)

[C] a ​particularperiod in ​time: the ​modern/​industrial/​Victorian age

ageverb [I/T]

 us   /eɪdʒ/

age verb [I/T] (TIME SPENT ALIVE)

to ​become or ​appearold, or to ​cause someone to ​appearold: [I] She’s aged a lot since the last ​time we ​met. Note: usually said about a person To age ​food or ​drink is to give it ​time to ​becomeripe or ​develop a ​fullflavor: [T] The ​cheese is aged for three to six ​months.
(Definition of age from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "age" - British English Dictionary

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agenoun

uk   us   /eɪdʒ/

age noun (TIME SPENT ALIVE)

A1 [C or U] the ​period of ​time someone has been ​alive or something has ​existed: Do you ​know the age of that ​building? What age (= how ​old) isyourbrother? I'd ​guess she's about my age (= she is about as ​old as I am). She was 74 years of age when she ​wrote her first ​novel. He ​lefthome at the age of 16. I was ​married with four ​children atyour age. She's ​starting to show/​look her age (= to ​look as ​old as she is). I'm really ​beginning to feel my age (= ​feelold). His girlfriend's ​twice his age (= ​twice as ​old as he is).act your age! said to someone to ​tell them to ​stopbehaving like someone who is much ​youngerthe age of consent the age at which someone is ​considered by the ​law to be ​old enough to ​agree to have ​sex with someone
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age noun (PERIOD)

B1 [C] a ​particularperiod in ​time: the ​Victorian age the ​modern age the ​nuclear age
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age noun (LONG TIME)

ages B1 [plural] informal (also mainly UK an age [S])
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a very ​longtime: It takes ages to ​cook. I've been ​waiting for ages. It's been ages/an age since we last ​spoke.

age noun (BEING OLD)

C2 [U] the ​fact of being or getting ​older: Her back was ​bent with age. This ​cheese/​wineimproves with age. Her ​temper hasn't ​improved with age!
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ageverb [I or T]

uk   us   /eɪdʒ/ (present participle UK ageing or US aging, past tense and past participle aged)
If someone ages or something ages them, they ​lookolder: She's aged since the last ​time we ​met. to ​develop in ​flavour or ​leave something to do this: The ​brandy is aged in ​oak for ten ​years.
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-agesuffix

uk   us   /-ɪdʒ/

age suffix (ACTION)

used to ​formnouns that refer to the ​action or ​result of something: blockage shrinkage wastage All ​breakages must be ​paid for.

age suffix (STATE)

used to ​formnouns that refer to a ​state or ​condition: bondage marriage shortage

age suffix (PLACE)

used to ​formnouns that are ​names of ​places: orphanage vicarage
(Definition of age from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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