Definition of “alike” - English Dictionary

“alike” in British English

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alikeadjective [ after verb ]

uk /əˈlaɪk/ us /əˈlaɪk/

B1 similar to each other:

The children all look very alike.

More examples

  • The twins look alike, but they differ in temperament.
  • The film's message is that rich and poor are alike.
  • As babies, the twins were so alike that I just couldn't tell them apart.
  • For the first few months the babies looked so alike I couldn't tell which was which.
  • Our views on politics are very alike.

alikeadverb

uk /əˈlaɪk/ us /əˈlaɪk/

B2 in a similar way:

The twins even dress alike.
My father treated us all alike.

B2 used after referring to two groups of people or things to show that both groups are included:

Friends and family alike were devastated by the news of her death.

More examples

  • For the first few months the babies looked so alike I couldn't tell which was which.
  • His latest play has delighted theatre audiences and theatre critics alike.
  • After the trial he was shunned by friends and family alike.
  • It's quite common to see couples who dress alike.
  • We argue sometimes, but we usually think alike when it comes to important things.

(Definition of “alike” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“alike” in American English

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alikeadjective

us /əˈlɑɪk/

alike adjective (SIMILAR)

similar; like each other:

You and your father don’t look very much alike.

alike adverb [ only after n, not gradable ] (EQUALLY)

equally; both:

She received hundreds of letters of support from friends and strangers alike.

(Definition of “alike” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)