Definition of “anyway” - English Dictionary

british dictionary

“anyway” in British English

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anywayadverb

uk /ˈen.i.weɪ/ us /ˈen.i.weɪ/ also anyhow

A2 whatever else is happening, without considering other things:

Of course I don't mind taking you home - I'm going that way anyway.
"I thought you said everyone had left." "Well, some of them have anyway."
Her parents were opposed to her giving up her course, but she did it anyway.

A2 In conversation, anyway is also used to change the subject, return to an earlier subject, or get to the most interesting point:

Anyway, as I said, I'll be away next week.
Anyway, in the end I didn't wear your jacket.
What was he doing with so much of the company's money in his personal account anyway?

B1 used to give a more important reason for something that you are saying:

I don't have time to go, and anyway it's too expensive.

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(Definition of “anyway” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“anyway” in American English

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anywayadverb [ not gradable ]

us /ˈen·iˌweɪ/ infml anyhow

not considering other facts or conditions; considered independently, without being influenced by other things:

Of course I don’t mind taking you home – I’m going that way anyway.
The economy was slowing down anyway, so there was no need to worry about inflation.

In conversation, anyway is often used to support or explain a previous statement:

So, you’re right, there are very few black quarterbacks in football, or at least that are starting anyway.

In conversation, anyway is often used to change the subject, return to an earlier subject, or get to the most interesting point, and is also used to take up time so that you can decide what to say next:

So anyway, what are you going to do tonight?
Anyway, in the end we just agreed to stop seeing each other.

(Definition of “anyway” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)