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Definition of “attract” - English Dictionary

"attract" in American English

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attractverb [T]

 us   /əˈtrækt/
to ​cause something to come toward something ​else, or to ​cause a ​person or ​animal to ​becomeinterested in someone or something: An ​openflame attracts ​moths. The ​tennischampionship will attract a lot of tourists to the ​city. This ​movie is going to attract a lot of ​attention.
If someone is attracted to someone ​else, he or she ​likes the other ​person or is ​interested in that ​person.
(Definition of attract from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"attract" in British English

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attractverb

uk   /əˈtrækt/  us   /əˈtrækt/
B1 [T] (of ​people, things, ​places, etc.) to ​pull or ​draw someone or something towards them, by the ​qualities they have, ​especially good ​ones: These ​flowers are ​brightlycoloured in ​order to attract ​butterflies. The ​circus is attracting ​huge crowds/​audiences. The ​government is ​trying to attract ​industry to the ​area (= to ​persuadepeople to ​placetheirindustry there). Her ​ideas have attracted a lot of attention/​criticism in the ​scientificcommunity.
B2 [T usually passive] If you are attracted by or to someone, you like them, often ​finding them ​sexuallyinteresting: I'm not physically/​sexually attracted to him.
specialized physics When something such as a magnet attracts something ​else, it ​pulls it towards it: Magnets attract ​ironfilings. Since ​light has no ​mass, Newton's ​equationpredicts that it will not be attracted by ​gravity towards anything.

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(Definition of attract from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"attract" in Business English

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attractverb [T]

uk   us   /əˈtrækt/
to make ​people want to visit a ​place or ​find out more about something: attract visitors/audiences/fans The ​exhibition attracted over 10,000 visitors.attract interest/attention Fuel-cell ​technology has been around for 150 ​years, so why is it attracting ​attention now?attract sth from sb It was the biggest AIDS ​meeting ever, attracting 17,000 ​people from around the ​world.attract sb to sth They are ​trying to attract more holiday-makers to the ​area.
to make someone want to ​buy or ​invest in something: attract business/investment/funding They're ​trying to attract ​foreigninvestment in the ​region.attract sb to sth The high ​yen attracted ​investors to South Korean ​manufacturingshares.
to ​interest someone and make them want to do something such as ​join a ​company: I was attracted by the ​opportunity to ​work abroad.attract sb to sth What attracted you to this ​job?
FINANCE if a ​product or ​investment attracts a particular ​charge, you have to ​pay that ​charge if you have the ​product or ​investment: Payments by ​creditcard attract a 2% ​handlingcharge. The ​loan attracts a ​lowrate of ​interest.
(Definition of attract from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“attract” in Business English

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