bar Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “bar” - English Dictionary

Definition of "bar" - American English Dictionary

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barnoun

 us   /bɑr/

bar noun (POLE)

[C] a ​strongpole, esp. one made of ​metal, used as a ​support, to ​force something to move, or to ​block an ​opening: He ​stuck his ​hand through the bars of the ​cage [C] A bar is also any of ​varioussmallobjects having a ​rectangularshape: a ​granola bar

bar noun (DRINKING PLACE)

[C] a ​place, sometimes within a ​restaurant, where ​alcoholicdrinks are ​served, or a ​long, high ​table in such a ​place along which ​peoplestand or ​sit while ​drinking: He used to just ​sit in a bar and ​listen to ​jazz. They ​sat at the bar and ​chatted with the ​bartender.

bar noun (MUSIC)

[C] (also measure) one of the ​smallequalparts into which a ​piece of ​music is ​divided, ​containing a ​fixednumber of ​beats: He ​played four bars of ​music. [C] (also measure) A bar is also one of the ​verticallines that ​divide a ​piece of ​music into ​equalparts.

bar noun (LAWYERS)

[U] all ​lawyersconsidered as a ​group: She ​passed the Massachusetts bar ​exam on her first ​try.

barverb [T]

 us   /bɑr/ (-rr-)

bar verb [T] (PREVENT)

to ​prevent someone from doing something or going ​somewhere: Protesters ​tried to ​break into the ​building, but the ​police barred ​their way.

bar verb [T] (POLE)

to put a ​strongpole or ​polesacross an ​opening: We barred the ​windows as ​protection against ​burglars.

barpreposition

 us   /bɑr/

bar preposition (EXCEPT)

except for: He’s the ​greatestpitcher of all ​time, bar none (= no one ​else is ​better).
(Definition of bar from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "bar" - British English Dictionary

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barnoun [C]

uk   /bɑːr/  us   /bɑːr/

bar noun [C] (DRINKING PLACE)

A1 a ​place where ​drinks, ​especiallyalcoholicdrinks, are ​sold and ​drunk, or the ​area in such a ​place where the ​personserving the ​drinksstands: They ​noticed him going into the ​hotel bar. There weren't any ​freetables, so I ​sat at the bar. Why don't you ​ask the ​guy behind the bar (= ​servingdrinks there)?
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bar noun [C] (LONG PIECE)

B2 a ​long, ​thin, ​straightpiece of ​metal or ​wood: The ​gorillarattled the bars of ​itscage.B1 a ​substance that has been made into a ​solidrectangularshape: a bar of ​soap a ​chocolate bar UK The bar of an electricheater is a ​long, ​thinwire in the ​shape of a spring that is ​wrappedtightly around a ​tube. When ​electricitypasses through it, it ​producesheat and ​redlight.
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bar noun [C] (MUSIC)

(US also measure) one of the ​smallequalparts into which a ​piece of ​music is ​divided, ​containing a ​fixednumber of beats: Waltzes have three ​beats in/to the bar (= in each bar). US (UK bar line) a ​verticalline that ​divides one bar from another in a written ​piece of ​music

bar noun [C] (ON UNIFORM)

US a stripe

bar noun [C] (PREVENTING)

C2 [C usually singular] something that ​prevents a ​particularevent or ​development from ​happening: A ​lack of ​formaleducation is no bar to becomingrich.

barverb [T]

uk   /bɑːr/  us   /bɑːr/ (-rr-)

bar verb [T] (PREVENT)

to ​prevent something or someone from doing something or going ​somewhere, or to not ​allow something: The ​centre of the ​town was barred tofootballsupporters. The ​incidentled to him being barred from the ​country/barred fromentering the ​country. I ​tried to ​push past her but she barred my way/​path (= ​stood in ​front of me and ​prevented me from getting past).

bar verb [T] (CLOSE)

to put bars ​across something, ​especially to ​keep it ​closed: We barred the ​door to ​stop anyone getting into the ​room.

barpreposition

uk   /bɑːr/  us   /bɑːr/ formal
except: Everyone is ​leaving the ​village, bar the very ​old and ​ill. They're the ​bestsongwriters of this ​century, bar none (= no one ​else is ​better).
(Definition of bar from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "bar" - Business English Dictionary

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barnoun [C]

uk   us   /bɑːr/
something that prevents a particular ​event or ​development from ​happening: a bar (to sth) A ​lack of ​formaleducation does not have to be a bar to ​success in ​business and ​politics.

barverb [T]

uk   us   /bɑːr/ (-rr-)
LAW to prevent something or someone from doing something or going somewhere, or to ​refuse to ​allow something: bar sb/sth from (doing) sth Lawyers on both ​sides have been barred from discussing the ​case in the ​press. The ​governmentvoted to bar the ​import of exotic birds.
(Definition of bar from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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