bargain Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “bargain” - English Dictionary

Definition of "bargain" - American English Dictionary

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bargainnoun [C]

 us   /ˈbɑr·ɡən/

bargain noun [C] (AGREEMENT)

an ​agreement between two ​people or ​groups in which each ​promises to do something in ​exchange for something ​else: He ​failed to ​carry out his ​side of the bargain.

bargain noun [C] (LOW PRICE)

something ​sold for a ​price that is ​lower than ​usual or ​lower than ​itsvalue: We got ​tickets to the show at half-price, a ​real bargain.

bargainverb [I]

 us   /ˈbɑr·ɡən/

bargain verb [I] (LOW PRICE)

to ​try to ​reachagreement with someone in ​order to get a ​lowerprice: You can usually bargain with ​antique dealers.
bargaining
noun [U]  /ˈbɑr·ɡə·nɪŋ/
Harriman ​pressed for ​tougher bargaining by the American ​side.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of bargain from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "bargain" - British English Dictionary

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bargainnoun [C]

uk   /ˈbɑː.ɡɪn/  us   /ˈbɑːr-/

bargain noun [C] (LOW PRICE)

B1 something on ​sale at a ​lowerprice than ​itstruevalue: This ​coat was ​half-price - a ​real bargain. The ​airlineregularlyofferslast-minutebookings at bargain prices. The ​sales had ​started and the bargain hunters (= ​peoplelooking for things at a ​lowprice) were out in ​force.
More examples

bargain noun [C] (AGREEMENT)

an ​agreement between two ​people or ​groups in which each ​promises to do something in ​exchange for something ​else: "I'll ​clean the ​kitchen if you ​clean the ​car." "OK, it's a bargain." The ​management and ​employeeseventually struck/made a bargain (= ​reached an ​agreement).

bargainverb [I or T]

uk   /ˈbɑː.ɡɪn/  us   /ˈbɑːr-/
to ​try to make someone ​agree to give you something that is ​better for you, such as a ​betterprice or ​betterworkingconditions: Unions bargain withemployers for ​betterrates of ​pay each ​year.
(Definition of bargain from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "bargain" - Business English Dictionary

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bargainnoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈbɑːɡɪn/
COMMERCE something that is on ​sale at a ​lowerprice than usual: The ​airlineregularlyoffers last-minute ​bookings at bargain ​prices.
an ​agreement between two ​people or ​groups in which each promises to do something in ​exchange for something else: strike/make a bargain The ​management and ​employees eventually ​struck a bargain.
See also
COMMERCE a ​situation in which two or more ​peopleagree on a ​price that something is ​sold at: strike a bargain They ​felt that the ​offer was too ​low but after some ​negotiation they eventually ​struck a bargain.
STOCK MARKET in the UK, an ​act of ​buying or ​sellingshares on the London Stock Exchange: After the bargain is completed, the ​broker will want to know when ​payment will be made.
into the bargain (US also in the bargain) in ​addition to other facts which have been mentioned previously: Our latest ​recruit is an excellent ​analyst, and a very good ​manager into the bargain.

bargainverb [I]

uk   us   /ˈbɑːɡɪn/
COMMERCE, HR to discuss something with somebody, for ​example a ​price or a ​rate of ​pay, in ​order to get an ​agreement that is of ​advantage to you: bargain (with sb) (for/over sth) Unions bargain with ​employers for better ​rates of ​pay each ​year.
(Definition of bargain from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“bargain” in Business English

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