bear Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “bear” - English Dictionary

Definition of "bear" - American English Dictionary

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bearnoun [C]

 us   /beər/

bear noun [C] (ANIMAL)

a ​large, ​strongmammal with ​thickfur that ​lives esp. in ​colderparts of the ​world: a ​black/​grizzly/​polar bear

bearverb

 us   /beər/ (past tense bore  /bɔr, boʊr/ , past participle borne  /bɔrn, boʊrn/ )

bear verb (CARRY)

[T] to ​carry or ​bring something: Fans bearing ​bannersringed the ​stadium.

bear verb (SUPPORT)

[T] to ​hold or ​support something: The ​bridge has to be ​strengthened to bear ​heavierloads.

bear verb (ACCEPT)

to ​accept something ​painful or ​unpleasant with ​determination and ​strength: [T] Since you will bear most of the ​responsibility, you should get the ​rewards. [+ to infinitive] He could not bear to ​see her ​suffering.

bear verb (HAVE)

[T] to have as a ​quality or ​characteristic: My ​life bore little ​resemblance to what I’d hoped for.

bear verb (PRODUCE)

[T] (past participle born  /bɔrn, boʊrn/ ) (of ​mammals) to give ​birth to ​young, or of a ​tree or ​plant to give or ​producefruit or ​flowers: She bore three ​children in five ​years. Note: When talking about mammals, use the past participle spelling "born" to talk about a person or animal’s birth, and the spelling "borne" to talk about a mother giving birth to a child: She had borne four ​boys.

bear verb (TRAVEL)

[I always + adv/prep] to ​travel or move in the ​stateddirection: After you ​pass the ​light, bear ​left until you come to a ​bank.
Idioms
(Definition of bear from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "bear" - British English Dictionary

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bearverb

uk   /beər/  us   /ber/ (bore, borne or US also born)

bear verb (ACCEPT)

B2 [T] to ​accept, tolerate, or endure something, ​especially something ​unpleasant: The ​strain must have been ​enormous but she bore it well. Tell me now! I can't bear the ​suspense! It's ​yourdecision - you have to bear the ​responsibility if things go ​wrong. [+ to infinitive] He couldn't bear tosee the ​dog in ​pain. [+ -ing verb] I can't bear beingbored.not bear thinking about to be too ​unpleasant or ​frightening to ​think about: "What if she'd been ​drivingfaster?" "It doesn't bear ​thinking about."
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bear verb (HAVE)

C1 [T] to have or ​continue to have something: Their ​baby bears astrongresemblance toitsgrandfather. The ​stoneplaque bearing his ​name was ​smashed to ​pieces. On ​display were ​boxinggloves that bore Rocky Marciano's ​signature. [+ two objects] I don't bear them any ​illfeeling (= I do not ​continue to be ​angry with or ​dislike them). Thank you for ​youradvice - I'll bear it in ​mind (= I will ​remember and ​consider it).
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bear verb (SUPPORT)

[T] to ​hold or ​support something: The ​chair, too ​fragile to bear her weight, ​collapsed.

bear verb (PRODUCE)

C2 [T] formal to give ​birth to ​young, or (of a ​tree or ​plant) to give or ​producefruit or ​flowers: She had borne six ​children by the ​time she was 30. [+ two objects] When his ​wife bore him a ​child he could not ​hide his ​delight. Most ​animals bear ​theiryoung in the ​spring. The ​peartree they ​planted has never borne fruit.

bear verb (BRING)

[T] formal to ​carry and ​move something to a ​place: At ​Christmas the ​family all ​arrive at the ​house bearing gifts. Countless ​waiters bore ​trays of ​drinks into the ​room. The ​sound of the ​icecreamvan was borne into the ​office on the ​wind.

bear verb (CHANGE DIRECTION)

C1 [I usually + adv/prep] to ​changedirectionslightly so that you are going in a ​particulardirection: The ​pathfollowed the ​coastline for several ​miles, then bore ​inland. After you go past the ​churchkeep bearing left/​right.

bear verb (SAY)

bear testimony/witness formal to say you ​know from ​your own ​experience that something ​happened or is ​true: She bore ​witness to his ​patience and ​diligence. If something bears ​testimony to a ​fact, it ​proves that it is ​true: The ​ironbridge bears ​testimony to the ​skillsdeveloped in that ​era.bear false witness old use to ​lie

bearnoun [C]

uk   /beər/  us   /ber/

bear noun [C] (ANIMAL)

A2 a ​large, ​strongwildmammal with a ​thickfurcoat that ​livesespecially in ​colderparts of ​Europe, ​Asia, and ​NorthAmerica: a ​brown/​black bear a bear ​cub (= ​young bear)
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bear noun [C] (MAN)

slang an ​oldergay man who is ​large and has a lot of ​hair on his ​body

bear noun [C] (FINANCE)

specialized finance & economics a ​person who ​sells shares when ​prices are ​expected to ​fall, in ​order to make a ​profit by ​buying them back again at a ​lowerprice
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(Definition of bear from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "bear" - Business English Dictionary

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bearnoun [C]

uk   us   /beər/ FINANCE, STOCK MARKET
someone who expects ​prices on a ​financialmarket to go down and ​sells their ​shares, etc. hoping to ​buy them back in the future at a ​lowerprice: The ​brokerage, which has been a persistent bear in recent months, ​switched its ​recommendation from ​sell to ​hold. The bears are ​driven by ​badeconomicnews from Japan, such as July's 2.4% monthly ​slump in ​industrialproduction.
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See also
(Definition of bear from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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