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Definition of “bell” - English Dictionary

"bell" in American English

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bellnoun [C]

 us   /bel/
a hollow, cup-shaped, metal object that makes a ringing sound when a part hanging inside swings against its sides, or when it is hit by any hard object: The school bell was ringing.
A bell is also a doorbell.
(Definition of bell from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"bell" in British English

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bellnoun [C]

uk   /bel/  us   /bel/
B1 (also doorbell) an electrical device that makes a ringing sound when you press a button: I stood at the front door and rang the bell several times.
B2 a hollow metal object shaped like a cup that makes a ringing sound when hit by something hard, especially a clapper: The church bells rang out to welcome in the New Year.

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(Definition of bell from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"bell" in Business English

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bellnoun

uk   us   /bel/
the bell
[S] STOCK MARKET the sound that signals the beginning and end of a period of trading on a stock exchange: after/before the bell The company said after the bell on Wednesday that its quarterly profit rose because of a 36% increase in sales of its software. Yesterday, all three major American indexes fell immediately after the opening bell.
alarm/warning bells
[plural] used to describe an occasion when you realize that something is wrong: ring/set off/sound warning bells These figures should sound warning bells that the consumer economy is increasingly fragile. Soaring costs of oil and gold set alarm bells ringing around the world.
(Definition of bell from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“bell” in Business English

A bunch of stuff about plurals
A bunch of stuff about plurals
by ,
May 24, 2016
by Colin McIntosh One of the many ways in which English differs from other languages is its use of uncountable nouns to talk about collections of objects: as well as never being used in the plural, they’re never used with a or an. Examples are furniture (plural in German and many other languages), cutlery (plural in Italian), and

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