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Definition of “benefit” - English Dictionary

"benefit" in American English

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benefitnoun [C/U]

us   /ˈben·əˌfɪt/
a helpful or good effect: [C] It was a giveaway to the rich, he said, and not something that’s a benefit to most Americans. [U] She wanted her money to be used for the benefit of (= to help) poor children.
social studies A benefit is also a helpful service given to employees in addition to their pay or to someone else who needs help: [C] health/medical benefits [C] I’m collecting unemployment benefits.
A benefit is also a party or other event that has the purpose of raising money.
benefit
verb [I/T] us   /ˈben·əˌfɪt/
[I] I have benefited greatly from her wisdom.
(Definition of benefit from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"benefit" in British English

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benefitnoun

us   uk   /ˈben.ɪ.fɪt/
  • benefit noun (ADVANTAGE)

B1 [C or U] a helpful or good effect, or something intended to help: The discovery of oil brought many benefits to the town. One of the many benefits of foreign travel is learning how to cope with the unexpected. He's had the benefit of an expensive education and yet he continues to work as a waiter. I didn't get/derive (much) benefit from school. With the benefit of hindsight (= helped by the knowledge learned later) it is easy for us to see where we went wrong.formal She drinks a lot less now, to the benefit of her health as a whole.

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  • benefit noun (MONEY FROM GOVERNMENT)

[C or U] UK US usually benefits the money given by the government to people who need financial help, for example because they cannot find a job: unemployment benefit I'm on benefit at the moment. If they could not prove they were looking for work, they could lose their benefit. We can help you find out if you qualify for any benefits.
  • benefit noun (EMPLOYEE EXTRAS)

[C] something such as a pension or health insurance that an employee receives in addition to their salary (= money): Management is trying to cut employee pay and benefits. There are many ways you can use retirement benefits to recruit the best workers.
  • benefit noun (EVENT)

[C] an event such as a concert, performance, etc. that is organized in order to raise money for people in need: benefit concert

benefitverb [I or T]

us   uk   /ˈben.ɪ.fɪt/ -t- or or -tt-
B2 to be helped by something or to help someone: I feel that I have benefited greatly from her wisdom. How can we benefit those who most need our help?

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(Definition of benefit from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"benefit" in Business English

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benefitnoun

uk   /ˈbenɪfɪt/ us  
[C] a helpful or good effect: The discovery of oil brought many benefits to the town.get/receive the benefit (of sth) Who received the benefit of the spending? To get the full benefit, this plan should be viewed as a long-term investment.reap the benefits (of sth) The industry is reaping the benefits of an increase in consumer confidence.economic/financial/environmental/health benefits The town is already receiving the economic benefits of the new shopping centre. a long-term/short-term/immediate benefit an added/additional benefit
[C or U] GOVERNMENT, FINANCE in some countries, money that is given by the government to people who cannot find a job, are too sick to work, etc.: As an unemployed mother, you can claim benefits. I'm on benefit at the moment. unemployment/disability/housing benefit a benefit claimant
[C, usually plural] HR advantages such as medical insurance, life insurance, and sick pay, that employees receive from their employer in addition to money: For working parents, childcare can be one of the most valuable employee benefits a company offers. The company offers a generous benefits package that includes private healthcare and a free on-site gym.
[C] INSURANCE payment from an insurance policy or a pension plan: Last year, the UK insurance industry paid out nearly £188 million every day in pension and life insurance benefits. 50 is the earliest age the law allows people to receive their pension benefits. His wife will receive his full benefits when he dies.

benefitverb

uk   /ˈbenɪfɪt/ us   -t-, -tt-
[I] to be helped by something: Investors will benefit because our advisers will be able to offer high quality advice.benefit from sth Many oil companies benefited from the rising price of crude oil.
[T] to help someone: The new travel scheme, offering free travel, benefits people over the age of 60.
(Definition of benefit from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“benefit” in Business English

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