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Definition of “better” - English Dictionary

"better" in American English

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betteradjective

 us   /ˈbet̬·ər/
  • better adjective (HIGHER STANDARD)

of a ​higherstandard, or more ​suitable, ​pleasing, or ​effective than other things or ​people; comparative ofgood: He ​sat near the ​front to get a better ​view. Relations between the two ​countries have never been better. She is much better at ​tennis than I am.
Better can also be used as the ​comparative to ​formadjectivesbeginning with good: She’s ​good-looking, and her ​brother is ​even better-looking.

betteradverb

 us   /ˈbet̬·ər/
  • better adverb (GREATER DEGREE)

to a ​greaterdegree, or in a more ​suitable, ​pleasing, or ​satisfactory way; comparative ofwell: The next ​time he took the ​test, he was better ​prepared. I like this ​jacket much better than the ​brown one. She ​knows her way around the ​college better than I do. She did much better (= She was more ​successful) in the second ​part of the ​exam.
If you are or get better after an ​illness or ​injury, you are ​healthy and no ​longerill.

betterverb [T]

 us   /ˈbet̬·ər/ fml
  • better verb [T] (IMPROVE)

to ​improve a ​situation, ​condition, or ​person: The ​organization was ​established to better ​conditions for the ​disabled.

betternoun [U]

 us   /ˈbet̬·ər/
  • better noun [U] (IMPROVEMENT)

used in ​comparisons to show that a ​condition is ​improved: The ​cleaner the ​glass is, the better you can ​see.
(Definition of better from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"better" in British English

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betteradjective

uk   /ˈbet.ər/  us   /ˈbet̬.ɚ/
A1 comparative of good : of a ​higherstandard, or more ​suitable, ​pleasing, or ​effective than other things or ​people: He ​stood near the ​front to get a better ​view. Relations between the two ​countries have never been better. It's much better to have a ​small, ​cosyroom than a ​big, ​cold one. The ​book was better than I ​expected. She is much better attennis than I am. It is far (= much) better to ​save some of ​yourmoney than to ​spend it all at ​once. Fresh ​vegetables are better for you (= more ​beneficial to you) than ​cannedones. The ​longer you ​keep this ​wine, the better it ​tastes (= it has a better ​flavour if you ​keep it for a ​longtime). The ​bed was hard, but it was better than nothing (= than not having a ​bed).
A1 If you are or get better after an ​illness or ​injury, you are ​healthy again: I ​hope you get better ​soon.
get better
to ​improve: After the ​ceasefire, the ​situation in the ​capital got better. She's getting much better atpronouncingEnglish words.

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betteradverb

uk   /ˈbet.ər/  us   /ˈbet̬.ɚ/
A2 in a more ​suitable, ​pleasing, or ​satisfactory way, or to a ​greaterdegree: The next ​time he took the ​test, he was better ​prepared. They did much better (= were more ​successful) in the second ​half of the ​game. I like this ​jacket much better than (= I ​prefer it to) the other one. She ​knows her way around the ​college better than I do.
to a ​greaterdegree, when used as the comparative of ​adjectivesbeginning with "good" or "well": She is better-looking (= more ​attractive) than her ​brother. He is much better ​known for his ​poetry than his ​songwriting.
better still (also even better)
used to say that a ​particularchoice would be more ​satisfactory: Why don't you give her a ​call or, better still, go and ​see her?
sb had better do sth
A2 used to give ​advice or to make a ​threat: You'd better (= you should) go ​home now before the ​rainstarts. He'd better ​pay me back that ​money he ​owes me ​soon, or ​else.
sb would do better UK
it would be ​wiser: You would do better tobring the ​plants inside when the ​weather gets ​colder.

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betternoun

uk   /ˈbet.ər/  us   /ˈbet̬.ɚ/
[U] something that is of a ​higherstandard than something ​else: He ​ran the 100 ​metres in 9.91 ​seconds, and I have not ​seen better (= a ​fasterresult) this ​year.
[U] behaviour, ​work, or ​treatment that is more ​suitable, ​pleasing, or ​satisfactory: You shouldn't be so ​mean to ​yourmother - she deserves better. I didn't ​think he would go out without ​telling me - I ​expected better of him.
betters [plural] old-fashioned
people of a ​higherrank or ​socialposition than you: As ​children, we were ​taught not to ​argue with ​our elders and betters.

betterverb [T]

uk   /ˈbet.ər/  us   /ˈbet̬.ɚ/
(Definition of better from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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