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Definition of “bit” - English Dictionary

"bit" in American English

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bitnoun [C]

 us   /bɪt/
  • bit noun [C] (PIECE)

a small piece or a small amount of something: little bits of paper We need every bit of evidence we can find. We showed a little bit on videotape. Could you talk a bit (= for a short period) about your childhood experiences?
A bit or a little bit can mean slightly or to some degree: We found the dinner a little bit of a disappointment.
  • bit noun [C] (HORSE)

a piece of metal put in a horse’s mouth to allow the person riding it to control its movements
  • bit noun [C] (COMPUTER)

the smallest unit of information in a computer, represented by either 0 or 1
  • bit noun [C] (TOOL)

the part of a tool used to cut or drill (= make holes)

bit

 us   /bɪt/
  • bit (BITE)

past simple of bite
(Definition of bit from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"bit" in British English

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bitnoun [C]

uk   /bɪt/  us   /bɪt/
  • bit noun [C] (AMOUNT)

A2 informal a small piece or amount of something: Would you like a bit of chocolate? The glass smashed into little bits. There were bits of paper all over the floor. She tries to do a bit of exercise every day. I don't understand this bit.
a bit informal
B2 a short distance or period of time: I'm just going out for a bit. See you later. Can you move up a bit?
a bit of sth
C1 a slight but not serious amount or type of something: Maria's put on a bit of weight, hasn't she? It's a bit of a nuisance.
a bit...
A2 slightly: The dress is a bit too big for me. That was a bit silly, wasn't it? I'm a bit nervous. I was hoping there'd be some food - I'm a bit hungry. Would you like a bit more cake? It's a bit like a Swiss chalet.
UK very: Blimey, it's a bit cold! And she didn't invite him? That was a bit mean!
bit by bit
C1 gradually: I saved up the money bit by bit.
not a bit
not in any way: She wasn't a bit worried about the test. "Are you getting tired?" "Not a bit."
quite a bit
B1 a lot: They have quite a bit of money.
to bits
into small pieces: The car was blown to bits. It just fell to bits in my hands.
very much: I love my son to bits.

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bitverb

uk   /bɪt/  us   /bɪt/
past simple of bite
(Definition of bit from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"bit" in Business English

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bitnoun [C]

uk   us   /bɪt/
IT the smallest unit of information in a computer's memory: Can I run 32-bit programs on a 64-bit computer?
(Definition of bit from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of bit?
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