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Definition of “bite” - English Dictionary

"bite" in American English

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biteverb

us   /bɑɪt/ past tense and past participle bit /bɪt/ , past participle bitten /ˈbɪt·ən/
  • bite verb (USE TEETH)

[I/T] to use your teeth to cut into something: [I/T] He bit (into) the apple. [I/T] You have to teach your children not to bite (other kids).
[I/T] If an insect bites, it breaks the surface of the skin of a person and leaves a sore place: [I] We can’t eat outside tonight – the mosquitoes are biting.
[I/T] A fish bites when it takes a fishing hook into its mouth: [I] We were on the lake all day, but the fish just weren’t biting.
  • bite verb (HAVE AN EFFECT)

[I] to have an effect that is often unpleasant or severe: When the recession began to bite, people spent less on eating out in restaurants.

bitenoun

us   /bɑɪt/
  • bite noun (USE OF TEETH)

[C] the act of using your teeth to cut and tear something, or the piece torn away: He took a few bites of the chicken and drank some water.
[C] A bite is also a sore place on the surface of your skin made by an insect: mosquito bites
[C] In fishing, a bite is a fish taking a hook in its mouth.
(Definition of bite from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"bite" in British English

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biteverb

uk   /baɪt/ us   /baɪt/ bit, bitten
  • bite verb (USE TEETH)

B1 [I or T] to use your teeth to cut into something or someone: He bit into the apple. He bites his fingernails.
[I] When a fish bites, it swallows the food on the hook (= curved piece of wire) at the end of a fishing line: The fish aren't biting today.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • bite verb (SNAKE/INSECT)

If an insect or snake bites you, it injures you by making a small hole in your skin: An insect bit me on the arm.

bitenoun

uk   /baɪt/ us   /baɪt/
  • bite noun (USING TEETH)

B2 [C] the act of biting something: He took a bite (= bit a piece) out of the apple.
  • bite noun (FISH)

[S] the act of a fish biting the hook (= curved piece of wire) on the end of a fishing line so that it is caught
  • bite noun (STRONG TASTE)

[U] If food has bite, it has a sharp or strong taste: I like mustard with bite.
(Definition of bite from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"bite" in Business English

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biteverb [I]

uk   /baɪt/ us  
start/begin to bite
to start to have a bad effect on something: When the credit crunch started to bite, many smaller firms were forced out of business. Sales will slow as interest rates begin to bite.
Phrasal verbs

bitenoun

uk   /baɪt/ us  
the bite of sth
the harmful effect of something: Homeowners need to be protected from the bite of tax increases.
take a bite out of sth
to reduce the number or amount of something: The budget deficit has taken a big bite out of federal funds.
[C] IT another spelling of byte
(Definition of bite from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“bite” in Business English

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