bite Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “bite” - English Dictionary

Definition of "bite" - American English Dictionary

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biteverb

 us   /bɑɪt/ (past tense and past participle bit  /bɪt/ , past participle bitten  /ˈbɪt·ən/ )

bite verb (USE TEETH)

[I/T] to use ​yourteeth to ​cut into something: [I/T] He bit (into) the ​apple. [I/T] You have to ​teachyourchildren not to bite (other ​kids). [I/T] If an ​insect bites, it ​breaks the ​surface of the ​skin of a ​person and ​leaves a ​soreplace: [I] We can’t ​eatoutsidetonight – the ​mosquitoes are biting. [I/T] A ​fish bites when it ​takes a ​fishinghook into ​itsmouth: [I] We were on the ​lake all ​day, but the ​fish just weren’t biting.

bite verb (HAVE AN EFFECT)

[I] to have an ​effect that is often ​unpleasant or ​severe: When the ​recessionbegan to bite, ​peoplespent less on ​eating out in ​restaurants.

bitenoun

 us   /bɑɪt/

bite noun (USE OF TEETH)

[C] the ​act of using ​yourteeth to ​cut and ​tear something, or the ​piecetorn away: He took a few bites of the ​chicken and ​drank some ​water. [C] A bite is also a ​soreplace on the ​surface of ​yourskin made by an ​insect: mosquito bites [C] In ​fishing, a bite is a ​fish taking a ​hook in ​itsmouth.
(Definition of bite from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "bite" - British English Dictionary

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biteverb

uk   us   /baɪt/ (bit, bitten)

bite verb (USE TEETH)

B1 [I or T] to use ​yourteeth to ​cut into something or someone: He bit into the ​apple. He bites his ​fingernails. [I] When a ​fish bites, it ​swallows the ​food on the hook (= ​curvedpiece of ​wire) at the end of a ​fishingline: The ​fish aren't biting today.
More examples

bite verb (SNAKE/INSECT)

If an ​insect or ​snake bites you, it ​injures you by making a ​smallhole in ​yourskin: An ​insect bit me on the ​arm.

bite verb (AFFECT BADLY)

[I] to have a ​bad or ​unpleasanteffect: Highermortgagerates are ​beginning to bite.

bite verb (SHOW INTEREST)

[I] to show ​interest in ​buying something: The new ​service is now ​available but ​clients don't ​seem to be biting.

bitenoun

uk   us   /baɪt/

bite noun (USING TEETH)

B2 [C] the ​act of biting something: He took a bite (= bit a ​piece) out of the ​apple.

bite noun (INJURY)

B2 [C] a ​soreplace or ​injury where a ​person, an ​animal, or an ​insect has bitten you

bite noun (FISH)

[S] the ​act of a ​fish biting the hook (= ​curvedpiece of ​wire) on the end of a ​fishingline so that it is ​caught

bite noun (FOOD)

have a bite to eat C2 (also have a quick bite) informal to ​eat a ​smallamount of ​food or a ​smallmeal

bite noun (STRONG TASTE)

[U] If ​food has bite, it has a ​sharp or ​strongtaste: I like ​mustard with bite.

bite noun (STRONG EFFECT)

[U] a ​powerfuleffect: This ​satire has (​real) bite.
(Definition of bite from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "bite" - Business English Dictionary

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biteverb [I]

uk   us   /baɪt/
start/begin to bite to ​start to have a ​badeffect on something: When the ​creditcrunchstarted to bite, many ​smallerfirms were ​forced out of ​business. Sales will ​slow as ​interestrates begin to bite.
Phrasal verbs

bitenoun

uk   us   /baɪt/
the bite of sth the harmful ​effect of something: Homeowners need to be ​protected from the bite of ​taxincreases.
take a bite out of sth to ​reduce the ​number or ​amount of something: The ​budgetdeficit has taken a ​big bite out of ​federalfunds.
[C] IT another spelling of byte
(Definition of bite from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“bite” in Business English

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