black Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “black” - English Dictionary

Definition of "black" - American English Dictionary

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blackadjective, noun [U]

 us   /blæk/

black adjective, noun [U] (COLOR)

(of) the ​darkestcolor there is, like ​night: He was ​dressed all in black. Black ​coffee or ​tea has no ​milk or ​cream in it.

blackadjective

 us   /blæk/

black adjective (DARK SKIN)

[-er/-est only] of or ​belonging to a ​group of ​people having ​skin that is ​brown, esp. ​African-Americanpeople: As a black woman, I am ​proud of my ​African-Americanheritage. Note: Although African-American is the word preferred by many, black is also widely used and is not offensive: Black ​leadersdisagreed over how to ​respond. As a noun, African-American is now more commonly used, but when describing historical events, black may be used.

black adjective (SAD OR BAD)

without ​hope, very ​bad, or ​sad: The blackest ​time of all was when his ​eyesfailed.
(Definition of black from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "black" - British English Dictionary

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blackadjective

uk   us   /blæk/

black adjective (COLOUR)

A1 having the ​darkestcolour there is, like the ​colour of ​coal or of a very ​darknight: black ​shoes
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black adjective (PEOPLE)

A2 (also Black) relating or ​belonging to ​people with black or ​darkbrownskin, ​especiallypeople who ​live in ​Africa or whose ​familyoriginally came from ​Africa: black ​culture Black Americans
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black adjective (COFFEE/TEA)

without any ​milk or ​creamadded: a ​cup of ​strong black ​coffee I like my ​tea black, with ​sugar.

black adjective (BAD)

without ​hope: The ​futurelooked black. literary bad or ​evil: a black-hearted ​villain

blacknoun

uk   us   /blæk/

black noun (COLOUR)

A2 [U] the ​colour of ​coal or of the ​sky on a very ​darknight: She often ​dresses in black (= in black ​clothes).black and white Black and ​whitephotography has no ​colours except black, ​white, and ​grey: The ​oldnewsreels were ​filmed in black and ​white. a black and ​whitephoto

black noun (PEOPLE)

(also Black) [C] offensive a black ​person

blackverb [T]

uk   us   /blæk/

black verb [T] (MAKE DARK)

to put a black ​substance on something or to make something black: The ​soldiers used to black ​theirfaces.

black verb [T] (AVOID)

UK If a tradeunion or other ​organization blacks ​goods or ​people, it ​refuses to ​handle or ​work with them.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of black from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "black" - Business English Dictionary

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blacknoun

uk   us   /blæk/ FINANCE
in the black FINANCE, ACCOUNTING a ​company or ​organization that is in the black has made a ​profit: Analysts ​predict that the ​group will end the ​fiscalyear in the black. FINANCE, STOCK MARKET shares that are in the black have ​increased in ​value: Smaller ​sharesended in the black, but with less dramatic ​gains than the blue ​chips. BANKING, ACCOUNTING a ​bankaccount that is in the black has ​money in it: We hope that the ​harder we ​work, the more our ​account will ​stay in the black.
go into/move into/return to, etc. the black to ​start making a ​profit after ​losingmoney: This is the biggest ​shopping day of the ​year, when ​retailersaim to go into the black. to ​increase in ​value: The ​mainindex actually ​moved back into the black late afternoon.
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blackverb [T]

uk   us   /blæk/
UK if a ​tradeunion blacks ​goods, an ​organization, etc. it ​refuses to ​deal with them
(Definition of black from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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