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Definition of “bond” - English Dictionary

"bond" in American English

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bondnoun [C]

 us   /bɑnd/
  • bond noun [C] (CONNECTION)

a ​close and ​lastingrelationship between ​people: The bond between ​parents and ​children is usually very ​strong.
  • bond noun [C] (DOCUMENT)

an ​officialdocument that ​states you will be ​paid a ​certainamount of ​money because you have ​lentmoney to a ​government or ​company: The ​countyissued $4 million in bonds for ​roadconstruction.

bondverb

 us   /bɑnd/
  • bond verb (GLUE)

[I/T] to ​stickmaterials together, usually using ​glue: [I] The ​pieces will bond in less than a ​minute.
  • bond verb (DEVELOP CONNECTION)

[T] to ​develop a ​close and ​lastingrelationship: The ​puppy and his ​master bonded ​quickly.
(Definition of bond from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"bond" in British English

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bondnoun

uk   /bɒnd/  us   /bɑːnd/
  • bond noun (CONNECTION)

B2 [C] a ​closeconnectionjoining two or more ​people: the bond(s) of ​friendship/​love There has been a ​close bond between them ​ever since she ​saved him from ​drowning. In ​societies with ​strong family bonds (= ​relationships), ​peopletend to ​livelonger.
  • bond noun (FINANCIAL DOCUMENT)

[C] an ​officialpaper given by the ​government or a ​company to show that you have ​lent them ​money that they will ​pay back to you at a ​particular interestrate: I ​invested some ​money in ​savings bonds.
  • bond noun (PROMISE)

[C] a written ​agreement or ​promise: They have ​entered into a ​solemn bond. [C] US specialized law an ​amount of ​money that is ​paid to ​formallypromise that someone ​accused of a ​crime and being ​kept in ​prison will ​appear for ​trial if ​released: The ​judgeordered that he post a $10,000 bond ​pending his ​appeal of the ​verdict.
  • bond noun (JOIN)

[C usually singular] a ​place where ​singleparts of something are ​joined together, ​especially with ​glue, or the ​type of join made: When the ​glue has set, the bond ​formed is ​watertight. a ​strong/​weak/​permanent bond
  • bond noun (ROPES)

bonds [plural] literary the ​ropes or ​chains that ​holdprisoners and ​prevent them ​moving around or ​escaping: Loose his bonds and set him ​free.

bondverb [I or T]

uk   /bɒnd/  us   /bɑːnd/
to ​stickmaterials together, ​especially using ​glue: This new ​adhesive can bond ​metal toglass.
(Definition of bond from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"bond" in Business English

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bondnoun

uk   us   /bɒnd/
[C] FINANCE an ​amount of ​money that an ​organization or ​governmentborrows and promises to ​pay back on an ​agreeddate with an ​agreedamount of ​interest, or the ​document that contains this ​agreement: a 10-year/20-year, etc. bond The first new bond is a 10-year bond, ​paying a 6.5% ​interestrate and ​repayable on ​Oct. 25, 2021.buy/invest in/sell/trade bonds We have ​kept sufficient ​money in a ​buildingsocietyaccount so we will not be ​forced to ​sell our bonds. Legislation was ​introduced to ​allowindigenous peoples to issue bonds to ​finance economic-development ​projects. Some ​investors cannot hold bonds that ​carry a ​rating worse than A.
[C] INSURANCE a ​type of ​insurance that ​protectsgovernmentorganizations, ​companies, etc. from ​losingmoney: Contractors ​registered with the ​state are ​required to have ​liabilityinsurance and a bond.
[C] US LAW a ​document in which a ​person or ​companyagrees to ​pay a particular ​amount of ​money if they do not do something that they promised to do: To ​safeguard the ​environment, mine ​operators must post a bond to ​pay for possible cleanups.
(Definition of bond from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“bond” in Business English

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