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Definition of “boom” - English Dictionary

"boom" in American English

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boomnoun [C]

 us   /bum/
  • boom noun [C] (PERIOD OF GROWTH)

social studies a period of sudden economic growth: Somehow farmers have survived the booms and busts of the past 50 years.
  • boom noun [C] (POLE)

a long, movable pole that holds the bottom edge of a sail and is attached to the mast of a boat
In television and movie making, a boom is a long, movable pole that has a microphone (= device that records sound) or camera on one end.
  • boom noun [C] (DEEP SOUND)

a deep, loud sound: What you heard was the boom of a rocket.

boomverb

 us   /bum/
  • boom verb (MAKE A DEEP SOUND)

[I/T] to make a deep, loud sound: [I] A voice boomed through the microphone.
  • boom verb (GROW SUDDENLY)

[I] to experience a period of sudden economic growth: At that time, Alaska was booming.
(Definition of boom from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"boom" in British English

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boomnoun

uk   /buːm/  us   /buːm/
  • boom noun (BOAT)

[C] specialized sailing (on a boat) a long pole that moves and that has a sail fastened to it

boomverb

uk   /buːm/  us   /buːm/
(Definition of boom from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"boom" in Business English

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boomnoun [C or U]

uk   us   /buːm/ ECONOMICS, FINANCE
a period of increased economic activity and growth: A decade of market-oriented reforms has touched off an economic boom. The country as a whole will suffer the economic cost of the abrupt end of a decade-long boom.fuel/create/cause a boom The country's radical tax system is helping fuel a boom that rivals Asia's tiger economies.experience/enjoy/undergo a boom The construction industry experienced a boom in the years following the war. boom in sth The boom in internet share prices has fuelled a huge growth in stock market values around the world.property/housing/building boom During the housing boom, lenders issued loans in record amounts.dotcom/internet/technology boom The dot.com boom generated $18 billion in stock options and capital gains taxes for the state. stock market/investment/price boom consumer/spending boom
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boomverb [I]

uk   us   /buːm/ ECONOMICS, FINANCE
to experience an increase in economic activity, interest, or growth: Small businesses have boomed, since the government passed a new law making it easier to set them up. Business is booming, producing increased earnings. With the economy booming, opportunities have never been better for entrepreneurs.
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(Definition of boom from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“boom” in Business English

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